Traditional fishing vessels, called Panga, in Indonesia (Daniel Schomel)

New Partnership Expands Our View to Artisanal Fisheries

Today, Global Fishing Watch is focused on tracking commercial-scale fishing fleets, because they are the ones required to carry Automatic Identification Systems that broadcast their information to satellites. But small, artisanal fishing vessels represent another side of the picture that can’t be ignored. Although they often employ low-tech, traditional fishing methods (especially in developing countries), small-boat subsistence fishers and those that supply local markets also supply major seafood supply chains and operate around the world. They catch about the same amount of fish for human consumption as commercial fisheries. Read more

Vessel heading to port at Limassol, Cyprus (Wikicommons)

Tweeting End of Season

Check out this Tweet by Rustu Yucel who used the Global Fishing Watch map to watch the close of the fishing season in Cypress this summer! Read more

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We’ve Launched!

Last Thursday, we kicked off the public launch of Global Fishing Watch with an announcement by actor and ocean advocate Leonardo DiCaprio at the Our Ocean Conference in Washington, DC.

After the announcement, organizer and host Secretary of State John Kerry stopped by our demonstration in the conference hall to speak with the team and participate in a live demo of the tool.

29091661354_8aa4a4143e_kThe previous night, at a pre-launch reception, the Secretary spoke to our guests, about the value Global Fishing Watch will bring the State Department’s Safe Ocean Network, an initiative to combat illegal fishing. “What we need to do with the Global Fishing Watch and the joining with this network,” Read more

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Global Fishing Watch Well Received in Jakarta

Last week our Chief Technology Officer Paul Woods and Google’s lead on the project, Brian Sullivan traveled to Jakarta, Indonesia, to participate in the South-East Asia and Pacific Regional Fisheries Summit. As part of the Economist Events’ World Ocean Initiative, the meetings brought together government, industry, the financial sector and scientists for two days of discussions on a wide array of topics related to fisheries reform across South-East Asia and the adjacent Western Pacific.  Read more

Longline anchors arranged on deck. (GeShaFish-Creative Commons)

Scientists develop precise methods to identify and measure three very different types of fishing activity

On dry land, ecologists and conservationists can map our human footprints on the landscape. We can see deforestation, mountaintop removal, river damming and development, and it is relatively easy to recognize our impacts on an ecosystem and the plants and animals that live there. Read more

Shark Fins from an illegal capture. (NOAA)

Right on Target, Satellite Monitoring Guided a Police Chase on the Open Ocean

The sheer size of the ocean poses one of the biggest challenges to curbing illegal fishing, especially for a tiny island nation like Palau whose territorial waters encompass a swath of ocean nearly the size of Texas. With just three vessels comprising the government’s patrol fleet, there has been little hope of defending Palauan waters from poachers. Read more

Chinese Fishing Vessel Fu Yuan Yu (courtesy Sea Shepherd)

Our Analyst Nets Another IUU Bust

We’re in the business of putting the simple truth on the table for others to see. So for us, there’s nothing more rewarding than learning that the information we share has been used to accomplish something important.

In early 2016, observations we posted on the SkyTruth blog initiated a chain of events that exposed a fleet of vessels fishing illegally in the Southern Indian Ocean. Read more

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Ending Hide & Seek at Sea: Global Fishing Watch in Science

The Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), located in the central Pacific between Hawaii and Australia, is the world’s largest UNESCO World Heritage Site. Spanning a swath of ocean roughly the size of California, its hosts a series of isolated seamounts and almost entirely uninhabited islands, all supporting rich, largely unspoiled ecosystems. Read more

A sampling of the publications in which the Global Fishing Watch prototype appeared.

Making Headlines: We’re On to Something!

It’s been less than two years since we first demonstrated the Global Fishing Watch prototype in public, and the media coverage hasn’t stopped. Since announcing the prototype we’ve been featured in more than 100 publications on six continents, from the Atlantic, the Wall Street Journal and International Business Times to media outlets in Russia, China, Read more

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Reading Tracks on the Water: A Team Effort for Humans and Machines

When it looks like spaghetti, it may be fishing. That’s one of the first lessons students learn when they’re working with Kristina Boerder, one of our academic partners from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Of course, she’s not teaching them about pasta. She’s teaching them about the movement patterns of ships at sea. The students are helping Kristina classify the tracks of ocean-going vessels recorded from satellite signals. Read more

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Peter Benchley Ocean Awards: Global Fishing Watch Partners Win Big

For a gathering of enthusiastic supporters of ocean conservation, you can’t do better than the Peter Benchley Ocean Awards. Referred to as the “Academy Awards for the Ocean” the event honors individuals from a variety of disciplines for their outstanding leadership in ocean conservation. Read more