Entries by Kimbra Cutlip

Adding Nano-Satellite Data Doubles Our Resolution

Today, we are pleased to announce that, through a partnership with Spire Global, Inc, we have doubled the amount of data we use to identify and track nearly 60,000 commercial fishing vessels on the world’s oceans. Publicly broadcast Automatic Identification System (AIS) messages received by satellites and ground-based receivers comprise the largest source of data in the […]

New Study: Greenhouse Gas Emissions are Rising as Vessel Traffic Grows

Commercial fishing is an energy-intensive business, and not just for the fishers hauling in the catch. Fishing vessels burn a lot of fuel. In fact, according to Naya Olmer, Marine Program Associate at the International Council on Clean Transportation, industrial-sized commercial fishing vessels are responsible for more than 4 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions released […]

Les escribo desde el Perú, donde acabo de presenciar el triunfo emocionante del equipo de Oceana.

Este carta de Andy Sharpless apareció por primera vez en el blog de Oceana. Lea la versión original en ingles aquí. Esta semana, el gobierno peruano cumplió con su compromiso de publicar sus datos nacionales de seguimiento de buques mediante la firma de un Memorando de Entendimiento. El compromiso inicial, que fue el resultado de […]

Guest Post: Illegal Fishing Part II– How Ocean Science And Technology Can Address IUU Fishing And Secure National, Economic, and Food Security Worldwide

Jonathan White is a retired Rear Admiral for the United States Navy and the President and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership. Last week, in this blog, he discussed how illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing threatens national, economic, and food security around the globe. Check it out here.

A Word From Tony Long, Global Fishing Watch’s New CEO

In early June of this year, at the first United Nations Ocean Conference, something unprecedented happened in the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing. Convinced by the Global Fishing Watch vision of increasing transparency on the world’s oceans, the government of Indonesia turned its proprietary vessel monitoring system (VMS) data over for publication […]

Welcome to Our New CEO, Tony Long

Today, Global Fishing Watch has announced the appointment of Tony Long as Chief Executive Officer. Tony becomes the first permanent CEO of Global Fishing Watch. He comes to us from The Pew Charitable Trusts where he directed the End Illegal Fishing Project. Prior to that, he served 27 years in the British Royal Navy where his affinity […]

Our Data Suggests Transhippment Involved in Refrigerated Cargo Vessel Just Sentenced to $5.9 Million and Jail Time for Carrying Illegal Sharks

The Ecuadoran government demonstrated a strong commitment to protecting its waters from illegal activity today when it handed down a $5.9 million fine to a Chinese refrigerated cargo vessel owner and a four year prison sentence to its captain for the illegal transport of sharks and shark fins in the protected waters of the Galapagos. […]

Transshipment Report Refined

Our commitment to open data and transparency is paying off. Input from Global Fishing Watch users and the public, is helping us refine and improve our analyses. Today, we’re publishing an update to our groundbreaking transshipment report. Download the report and data now.

Example of AIS Data for One Vessel

This post originally appeared on our Data Blog  The sample vessel track below shows position broadcasts of the Jin Sheng No.2, a Chinese fishing vessel with mmsi number 413270430. Over three weeks in March of 2015, this vessel steamed from the central Pacific to the coast of Japan, Korea, and China. While moving, a vessel […]

What Can We See When AIS Signals Disappear?

We are often asked about how Global Fishing Watch can be effective when vessel captains can simply turn off their AIS. And our answer has always been, “they have to turn it back on sometime—especially when entering port, and intentional blackouts raise a red flag.” Our recent analysis of fleet activity around the Argentine EEZ […]

AIS GAPS BY FLEET: January 1, 2017 – July 10,2017 On the maps below, each point indicates the start of a gap in AIS signals from a fishing vessel lasting more than 24 hours. [Read about our AIS gap analysis around the Argentine Exclusive Economic Zone] Number of gaps by flag state: